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. >> good evening. i'm the director of the yale law library and i'm here to welcome you to the library booktalk sister i want to thank the founders society for cosponsoring tonight's talk. tonight's program features logan beirne who is the author of a new book on america's first chief executive entitled "blood of tyrants: george washington and the forging of the presidency." this is very much a yale law school block. it began as a paper while logan was a law school student. the paper was written -- after graduation from law school in 2008 and working two years in a law firm, logan returned to yale law school in 2010 as a scholar and began turning the paper into the book that we feature tonight. appropriate laid we have the professor with those to comment on the book. professor is a highly distinguished member of the yale law school factoid. is the author of numerous books, monographs and articles, and several of his books have been featured in previous book club series sponsored by our library. according to a recently published study by my colleague, fred sugar, professor eskridge is
is something we should fear right now, since i was born there have been about 50,000 wiretaps approved by law enforcement. every year for last couple years more than 1.5 million requests have been made by law enforcement mostly through technology companies, without us knowing about it we can't find out who did it. there has been a game change over the last 10 years esince 9/11, where pendulum swung way in direction of government actually knowing a hell of a lot more about you know that they used to, that is troubling. neil: i think that the jeannie is out of the bottle, and whether government know spired or not -- inspired or not, the fact is when we hop to web sites, and allow ourselves to be an open book. we open our books, i'm saying where does it go. >> we as people have the right to do that as an individual. if i want to put my entire life out there great, but i can block my cousin and friend from facebook, but to matt's point, people don't know the kind of information that is being compiled from having your grocery store card. neil: government could overstep your block, you know? >> go
of involvement by her husband and brother-in-law came as an absolute shock to them all. as a mother, a sister, a daughter, a wife, katie deeply mourns the pain and loss to innocent victims, students, law enforcement officers, families and our community. in the aftermath of this tragedy she, her daughter and her family are trying to come to terms with this event. >> woodruff: meanwhile, both the "washington post" and the "new york times" have reported that the younger tsarnaev admitted his role in the attack. the "post" also reported he told investigators that u.s. involvement in the iraq and afghanistan wars were motivating factors. other accounts said there appeared to be no links to larger terrorist groups. in russia today, their mother said f.b.i. agents talked to her about tamerlan tsarnaev's trip back home last year, but she told them he was no radical. >> what happened is a terrible thing. but i know that my kids had nothing to do with it. i know it. i'm a mother. i have -- you know, i know my kids. i know my kids. i really -- my kids would never get involved in anything like that. >> w
will prosecute this terrorist through our civil system of justice. underu.s. law, the united states citizens can not be tried rather in military commissions. martha: but house armed services commission buck mckeown argues that the white house should reconsider. he says, quote, it seems premature to declare that we will not treat tsarnaev as an enemy combatant since we don't know about his affiliations. clearly american citizens must be tried to civilian court, but the same citizen viciously attacked his countrymen, should be exploited for his intelligence value before any trial begins. that will be a debate that rages on for some time on this issue. we'll talk more later in the show with former new york city mayor rudy giuliani. bill: looking forward to that coming up here. meanwhile the feds want to talk to the widow of the suspect, tamerlan. she is mother of 3-year-old daughter between the two. the her lawyer said talks are underway with the feds how to proceed with that. he revealed on the last day tamerlan was home when his wife left for work. martha: well the officers who capturedded dzhokh
combatant or enemy belligerent for purpose of evidence gathering. >> under the law of war there's no right to legal counsel when you're being questioned for national security purposes. so i hope the obama administration will allow that exception and they have a very bad track record here. >> the white house telling reporters it would try tsarnaev in federal court and no other options were considered. >> this is matter decide ode by the attend of yates and the attorney general. the whole national security team supports this decision. >> to bring it down for you, the confusion comes over the venue. there is no way under the military commissions act to try an american citizen at the military courts in guantanamo bay, but if a sed threshold of evidence was met, if there was evidence that the brothers were directed by a foreign terrorist organization that would call for enemy combatant status. >> we have been talking about the trip to russian that the older suspect took. it's my understanding you learn more about the trip. >> fox news was told that russia's equivalent othe fbi isn't a letter to
. -i guess i get it from both sides. we are very committed to the rule of law where immigration is concerned. are we counting border control turnarounds as part of the deportations rather than that criminal on the interior? border control pieces, the turnarounds as part of the deportation? >> if there is a removal. into the statistics. the plain fact of the matter is .ce has been extremely active i will tell you, one representative miller talked about this window of time and immigration, this is the window of time. we need to be looking at our worksite enforcement. that is a real driver of immigration. we need more tools. the statutes governing how you issecute someone continually incredible. we need to unclog the visa process. i'm familiar with cases in my hometown and outside my hometown or criminal aliens have been caught and turned over by local police. omg au or grlt charges and they are let go. r edo not know who they were who has that record that we have will be a priority l. >> i got another case recently. or thiss a warrant man's arrest in new york city. he was let go.
and therefore the younger brother is going to be able to relay that to law enforcement or are they going to continue these sort of dark patches where we have questions that will never be answered. >> last about the latest incident. two men in canada that apparently wanted to derail a train from canada probably headed to the u.s. they are identified as having support from al qaeda in iran. >> right. >> a lot of threads here. do they make sense to you? >> they don't make sense to me. that doesn't mean they aren't true. but as we've learned this week. as we've learned in the past, we should always be cautious about the early reports. one thing the canadian mounted police said there is no state sponsor. even if there is an al qaeda link it's not iran supporting attack. and it makes no sense what iran is doing. we're in negotiations. they're about to have a presidential campaign. this is not the way iran tens to operate. of course al qaeda and injury. she vows to dance again and run in the boston marathon. this is what she had to say to cnn's anderson cooper. >> i landed and was -- sort of cl
will release that videotape in a court of law. they've described it in extensive detail. that's going to be powerful, powerful evidence in a potential trial. tom, thanks very much. let's recap quickly the surviving suspect, dzhokhar tsarnaev, now facing federal charges, among them use gd and conspiring to 0 use a weapon of mass destruction rulgting in death. let's bring in our senior legal analyst jeffrey toobin. jeffrey, what happens next? >> what happens next is that the case will be presented to a grand jury. prosecutors will begin presenting evidence, leading to an indictment. i think the process is going to slow down a great deal. remember, this crime was only a week ago. the government is going to have to assemble a lot of scientific evidence trying to tie material that could be connected to the defendant, to the bomb itself. this is complicated stuff. i think it's going to be months in the grand jury until a final indictment is ready to be presented probably. and then at that point the case will be presented to a trial judge, and there will be motions and then a trial. >> he no
for intelligence, not law enforcement purposes. this is highly controversial and could affect the government's case. but at some point in that interrogation which only lasted a few hours, which apparently consisted of him writing answers because he can't speak due to the injury to his throat. at some point in that interrogation, agents, professional interrogators decided we're not going to get anywhere or we've already learned everything we can learn from him. they also have on their shoulder, breathing down their neck, so to speak, a federal rule of procedure which requires he be charged with something within 48 hours. otherwise they have to let him go. they did charge him with this complaint filed by an f.b.i. agent who basically wrote a ten-page affidavit summarizing the evidence that they have against him. this f.b.i. agent personally viewed the tapes, looked at the evidence, -- >>gretchen: basically he's charged with having a weapon of mass destruction and killing people. but there was so much controversy in the last couple of days about whether or not he should be an enemy combatant. senator
hill later today, when law enforcement officials brief lawmakers. john? >> all right, barbara starr, thanks so much. barbara starr in washington. i want to bring back fran townsend, cnn analyst, former homeland security adviser to president george w. bush. and fran, i want to get your take here. where do you think the investigation stands right now? we've had these initial criminal complaints given dzhokhar tsarnaev. we've seen sort of the case laid out just a little bit. but how about the investigation itself? what are the next steps? >> well, first of all, we know from investigators that they're cooperating with the russians. i talked to sources, federal sources, and the cooperation between russian authorities and the fbi is quite good. both want to understand what they might have missed, what they should have seen, and what they should have made of it as this case is unfolding. you know, there are questions about the older brother tamerlan's travels to russia, what he did and who he met with. those are the sorts of questions that are following up. in the meantime, here in the uni
're following. in cooperation with u.s. officials, canadian law enforcement officials say they have foiled a plot to blow up a passenger train. what can you tell me about that? >> reporter: a passenger train, matt, from new york to ontario. it would be on canada's version of amtrak. they got onto it lastfall when they got a tip from the ka madian muslim community. authorities have been watching these two men closely since then. they say the plot was inspired by al qaeda in iran which they say was providing, quote, direction and guidance. now according to officials in both the u.s. and canada this plot never got to the stage of acquiring explosives, but even so he, these officials say the two men have both the intent and the capability of following through with it, matt. >> frightening possibility. thanks very much. >>> we are following two major stories this morning when it comes to flying. federal officials are putting on hold a new rule that would allow small knives back on planes. it was supposed to take effect on thursday but it has received strong opposition from flight crews and some
delayed so passengers, advocates and law enforcement experts can weigh in. the tsa plan to allow knives with small blades on planes starting this thursday. it would have been the first time they would have been back on passenger planes since september 11th, 2001. >>> new york city at it again. it may become the biggest city in america to raise the legal age for buying cigarettes to 21. the city already opposes the highest cigarette taxes in the country. it also bans smoking in bars, parks and beaches while launching graphic advertising campaigns about the hazards of smoking. smokers of retailers say those restrictions are nannyish and bad for business. it aims at stopping young people from developing a habit that is the leading causes of death. they say the measure would drive younger smokers to neighboring communities t. hearing on the proposal set for may 2nd. i have a funny feeling joe and mika will have more to say about that story. the folk singer guitars who opened the woodstock festival in 1969 died on monday. ♪ sometimes i feel like i'm in time. >> rich chi haven's family said
that it was from law enforcement officials that it may have been from a failed suicide attempt. have we learned anything new specifically on that? >> reporter: we have spoken to the hospital about that, they will not give us any information. i spoke with a boston police chief yesterday, ed davis, and asked him specifically about that. he said he couldn't comment on it. but it is in his neck. it is keeping him from speaking. we know there was gunfire exchange and flash grenades that went off, which has caused dzhokhar tsarnaev to not be able to hear. he's lost part of his hearing. but he fell six to seven feet from the boat and there was lots of blood. with all the questioning and everything you're talking about going on in the hospital and that he's -- he has this wound, and he is under medication, i asked a former fbi agent who worked with group, i said, what kinds of questions are they asking him right now? he says, i would imagine they're asking him about his brother's trips, about the rhetoric, about the associates, about plans, other devices, ultimate plan, others involved, about his dad,
, marking a dramatic turn for law enforcement officials trying to piece together what was behind that attack. our scott cohn is in boston and has the latest on the investigation. scott, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, carl. it's hard to believe it's been one week since those horrible bombings at the end of the boston marathon. later today at 2:50 local time, the precise time of those bombings one week ago, there will be a moment of silence in boston and church bells will toll throughout the city. dzhokhar tsarnaev, the 19-year-old bombing suspect remains in serious condition where he is recovering from his wound, but apparently he is alert enough to begin responding to some of the investigators' questions. many of those responses in writing because he has gunshot wound possibly, self-inflicted to the throat, but amazingly, he and his brother for some three days managed to hide in plain sight. dzhokhar at umass dartmouth where he was a student, he worked out in the gym, even talked to friends about the bombing. imagine how chilling that was for his classmates. >> i'm in diss belief,
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)